khatmal:

mountainofsons:

khatmal:

mountainofsons:

khatmal:

we were talking about our plans tomorrow since nakshawani is here for 3 days and my dad called him naqshbandi lmao

akbar are we going or what are you going for iftar or just the lecture

i’m pretty sure…

http://www.memri.org/image/12418.jpg

Anonymous Asked
QuestionI noticed your very interesting artistic rendition of Dr. Mossadegh. What made you aware and interested in him? By the way, which country you reside in? I would like to display the picture under your name in Dr. Mohammad Mossadegh Leader Fund Facebook. Thanks, Hamid Akbari, Professor at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago Thanks. Answer

REALLY? That’s wonderful!

I live in the United States, in Chicago actually. You can email me at jonhenne@sbcglobal.net if you’d like. That tends to be a better way of communication.

I originally became interested in Mossadegh with my curiosity of the origins of the Islamic Revolution. I’m Shi’a and wanted to see beyond the clergy and look into the secular figures of Iran. I read a couple of books on him and he seemed like a fairly honorable man. I’m no scholar or artist by any means but I’ve found the Shah’s family, Imam Khomeini, and Mossadegh all to be very inspiring. Although I don’t get the same level of mystique from Mossadegh as I do from Khomeini, I get a more tragic respect in my heart for him. Political and religious views aside, there is no denying the level of influence and power that Khomeini had. Mossadegh, on the other hand, gives me more of a sad feeling in my heart. He had good intentions for his people but fell victim to imperialism. While his secular dreams were crushed, Khomeini’s retaliation to imperialism was inspired by Ahlul Bayt (alayhi salaam) and religion. The two people contrast each other in such a beautiful sense to me. But as a Shi’a and socialist, the destruction of his dream by the CIA and MI5 is one that cannot be forgotten.